Daniel Cardoso – Employee Spotlight

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Daniel Cordoso Employee Spotlight

Daniel Simon Cardoso – Feria Youth Care Worker. 

Southwest Key staff do everything in their power to help the children feel safe and at home while they are in the shelter. Daniel Cardoso at Casa Conroe is one such employee. He uses his passion for tai chi to teach hundreds of kids this ancient martial art to help reduce stress and anxiety and increase flexibility and balance.

Why do you work at Southwest Key Programs Casa Conroe?

For the opportunity to assist children with learning tai chi. I’ve gone to every shelter to train our staff and clients on how tai chi can reduce stress, improve breathing and increase flexibility and energy. So many youths have said practicing this gives them a sense of calm and peace. I’ve also had the opportunity to always pursue professional growth thanks to my program director and assistant program director.

I’ve gone to every shelter to train our staff and clients on how tai chi can reduce stress, improve breathing and increase flexibility and energy. So many youths have said practicing this gives them a sense of calm and peace.

What is a typical day like for you?

In the morning, I analyze every detail of the lesson plan, ensure I have high energy and focus on motivating my team with a shared vision. I want everyone I work with to leave work with positive feelings. When the day ends, I am happy and satisfied with the work done for the children and my coworkers.

What’s your proudest moment on the job?

The last day of work at an emergency shelter in California in 2014, the children called me to their dormitories. When I arrived, they were all posed by their beds in a tai chi position and began to applaud enthusiastically. That spontaneous applause left an impact on me that will last forever.

Any fun facts to share?

My first tai chi class in California, Dr. Sanchez worked with me to find room for our tai chi program. He asked me, “How many children should we start with?” I told him probably twelve. A short time later, he came through the doors with 120 children! From then on, the classes always had at least a hundred children.